General Fit Talk General Discussion on the Honda Fit/Jazz.

Real gas mileage

  #1  
Old 09-19-2005, 06:21 PM
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Real gas mileage

Hey, I would like to know fom owners of the Fit/Jazz what you REAL gas mileage is. Published numbers are always off, so let me know what you get.


I was as the dealer yesterday:

Me: "So, when in the new Civic comming?"
Them "Huh, new civic?"

At that point I deciede not to ask when the Fit/Jazz will be here.
 

Last edited by Dañiel; 09-21-2005 at 11:02 AM.
  #2  
Old 09-21-2005, 01:54 AM
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  #3  
Old 02-29-2012, 06:23 PM
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I don't know why the link above is posted to a 1.3L gas milage? I have a 2012 Base automatic and when new I was getting 32 MPG avergae (actual checks not the dash meter reading) doing probably 50% highway driving. I now have 6000 miles on my Fit and it seems to be doing about 34 average so I assume the engine has broken in now. I just did my first oil (cough) change. I am using Mobil1 full synthetic which shows as meeting Honda's oil requirements. My last car was a 1996 Taurs which had 205,000 and was on Mobile1 all the way.
 
  #4  
Old 03-01-2012, 09:02 AM
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I just bought a 2012 MT Sport two weeks ago. My avg was 34.5 mpg on the first tank & 37 mpg about a quarter of the way into the second tank. This is about 60% highway & 40% urban. I'm sure as the engine breaks in and I get more familiar with the vehicle my mpg will get better, until Summer & I start running the a/c.
 
  #5  
Old 03-01-2012, 11:44 AM
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Walking Dead... original post was back in 2005!
Here's a link to the active thread for AT:
https://www.fitfreak.net/forums/eco-...ssion-5at.html
 
  #6  
Old 03-03-2012, 11:25 AM
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So I made a few adjustments based on discussions here, after purchasing the Fit new. Tire pressure to 45 psi, fuel usedswitched from 87 to 89 octace, matching shifts and revs. 5300 miles later, my average calculated MPG jumped from 34 to 37. Sure is nice to see the avg MPG counter increase instead of decrease, as was the case in my previous car (23 mpg average). Btw, based on 60/40 percent highway/city driving.

Have a few more ideas to complete, goal is to break 40 mpg mark on constinent basis.
 
  #7  
Old 03-03-2012, 03:49 PM
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You're off to a good start! Let us know when and how you do it. It is possible on a seasonal basis. Maintaining it year round is really difficult, but you just might.
 
  #8  
Old 03-03-2012, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Euromedic View Post
So I made a few adjustments based on discussions here, after purchasing the Fit new. Tire pressure to 45 psi, fuel usedswitched from 87 to 89 octace, matching shifts and revs. 5300 miles later, my average calculated MPG jumped from 34 to 37. Sure is nice to see the avg MPG counter increase instead of decrease, as was the case in my previous car (23 mpg average). Btw, based on 60/40 percent highway/city driving.

Have a few more ideas to complete, goal is to break 40 mpg mark on constinent basis.
Great results but watch your tire pressure. As the weather heats up so does the pressure in the tires so you might have to go down to 40. Also if your mpg drops from the heat you will have to step up the octane too.
 
  #9  
Old 03-04-2012, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by SilverBullet View Post
Also if your mpg drops from the heat you will have to step up the octane too.

Let the wild rumpus begin.

Paying for higher octane in an economy Honda is not why we bought the cars. Even when it heats up. Other than anecdotes and feelings posted here there is no literature to suggest any car that doesn't require higher octane actually benefits from it in terms of increased MPG. There are an equal number of anecdotes claiming no difference, even from those that initially drank the kool-aid.

There is a valid argument that it might increase top end power a tad, but this has not been documented, and wouldn't be part of any argument to save fuel.

When my Fit was new, I averaged 32 mpg. It increased over the first 15K miles to 34mpg. At 30K I changed the tires to Michelin Energy, had it aligned, and switched to 0w20 synthetic (current models come from the factory with this). At this point it increased to 36mpg (6.53L/100KM). My drive patterns have remained unchanged over this period.

This is over a 50 mile per day commute 75% freeway stop-and-go and 25% suburban street driving in Metro Atlanta. 87octane with lots of ethanol.
 

Last edited by Steve244; 03-04-2012 at 09:48 AM.
  #10  
Old 03-04-2012, 01:47 PM
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Around town, my 09 5/MT Sport gets ~35 MPG if I drive it without any regard to mileage. If I nurse it, I've averaged as high as 41.7 for an entire tank. I live in central OK, so not much up and down driving.
 
  #11  
Old 03-04-2012, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve244 View Post
Let the wild rumpus begin.

Paying for higher octane in an economy Honda is not why we bought the cars. Even when it heats up. Other than anecdotes and feelings posted here there is no literature to suggest any car that doesn't require higher octane actually benefits from it in terms of increased MPG. There are an equal number of anecdotes claiming no difference, even from those that initially drank the kool-aid.

There is a valid argument that it might increase top end power a tad, but this has not been documented, and wouldn't be part of any argument to save fuel.

When my Fit was new, I averaged 32 mpg. It increased over the first 15K miles to 34mpg. At 30K I changed the tires to Michelin Energy, had it aligned, and switched to 0w20 synthetic (current models come from the factory with this). At this point it increased to 36mpg (6.53L/100KM). My drive patterns have remained unchanged over this period.

This is over a 50 mile per day commute 75% freeway stop-and-go and 25% suburban street driving in Metro Atlanta. 87octane with lots of ethanol.
There is a knock sensor which is electronic octane. I got better mpg in the winter with 60 percent Highway and 40 city with RFG and winter blend. Thank you for sharing but I know you could have gotten higher mpg with premium, glad to see 0w20 actually raises mpg.

Honda says 87 or higher so with the 4-5 octane points of the Knock sensor it is effectively running 91 R/M octane. But it don't take in consideration temps and Octane Requirement Increase. Running 93 with the Knock sensor also raises the octane to 97 and Hondata says it will adjust to 96 which is over 100 octane then. Knock control tables

This issue of Road and Track says the epa uses quote "EPA’s certification fuel is indolene, a standardized test gasoline free of additives. One source cites an indolene MON of 87 and RON of 96.5, thus yielding a pump octane of 91.5; another, a pump octane of 92.9."

If your happy with your mpg on regular great but to make a statement that its regular only is false and there is proof if you look even Honda has it written 87 or higher. As far a the Fit being a performance car look at it this way a 3.5 liter vs 1.5. The 3.5 would have 275 HP vs 117 HP and the weight is different too. A car with the 3.5 would be about 1000 heavier than the FIT so the loads are lower with the 3.5 liter.
 
  #12  
Old 03-04-2012, 02:33 PM
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The R&T article is worth reading.

Here's an excerpt:

Originally Posted by Road and Track
The simplest answer of which fuel to use is to follow automaker advice contained in your car’s owners manual. This might be given as a requirement or merely as a recommendation. The latter might be qualified by a statement along the lines of “lower octane may yield reduced performance or inferior mpg.”

The reason for this has nothing to do with energy content. In fact, depending on its blending, a premium fuel may actually contain less energy per unit volume than regular. However, its potential for producing more power and enhanced mpg goes back to MBT and that knock sensor. If premium is recommended, this is the engine’s optimal fuel. It’ll run on regular—albeit with the sensor invoking ignition timing that’s less than that associated with MBT. And with less than Best Torque, there’ll be less performance and an mpg hit.

If the engine is tuned for regular but fueled with something of higher octane, things are a tad more complex. Most modern knock-sensed ignitions seek MBT timing and thus, at least in theory, profit from the added octane. Some, though, have preset ceilings beyond which they won’t advance.

And, in all cases, the differences depend on engine families, their octane sensitivities and intended performance levels. Without a stopwatch or dyno—and apart from your pocketbook—you may not even notice any detriment or benefit.
There's no mistaking a manufacturer's recommendation for higher octane. It's always accompanied by the qualifier; reduced performance may result from using a lower octane. A requirement will state damage may result from use of a lower octane.

I agree the Fit's engine is capable of advancing timing on higher octane, just that this won't have a measurable impact on MPG. The Fit is, after all, Honda's least expensive model in a line of economy cars, none of which currently require premium (the S2000 probably did) and only a few recommend premium under certain conditions (Ridgeline and Pilot when towing over 3,500 lbs).
 
  #13  
Old 03-04-2012, 09:06 PM
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It's a conspiracy. Whatever you do... DONT put in the factory recommended fuel grade. They just want you to spend less on gas so you can buy more accessories from the Honda store.

They would never put the real fuel grade that gets better gas mileage and would help them pass CAFE standards and get better advertising.
 
  #14  
Old 03-04-2012, 11:31 PM
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well, there is the argument they wouldn't want people to think an economy car benefited from more octane; it might scare away some buyers.

naw.
 
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