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Code P0300, P0301 and P0304

  #1  
Old 05-12-2019, 10:14 PM
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Code P0300, P0301 and P0304

Hello friends =)

I have a honda fit 2009 with 150k miles i came up with codes P0300, P0301 and P0304 the car will not go past 30hwy

I changed all the coils and spark plugs still have the problem

I have a simple question, i just found out on Wednesday the gas station i put in gas in had water in its pumps could gas water bring up a P0300, P0301 and P0304 codes
 
  #2  
Old 05-12-2019, 11:31 PM
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How did you find out the gas station was watering down the fuel?

I would put this on the gas station manager to sort of the water issue. If there were a lot of water mixed in you might want to stop driving and have the dealer drain and flush the fuel system, then sort out any issues caused by the water.

Of course, the problem might be entirely independent of water as very small quantities of water should not cause such major issues.

EDIT - buy your gas from a reputable supplier that has the will and finances to back up his product.
 
  #3  
Old 05-13-2019, 12:53 AM
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Drop that gas tank!! I'll be doing it with you. Its about time I solve my tank slosh issue, and theres a good chance it wont rain tomorrow!

If you can get the gas station folks to take accountability for this issue, outstanding! In all honesty, you could likely clear that trash out by adding a bunch of junk to your fuel like techron, lucas, seafoam, guaranteed to pass smog stuff. They all work to help algea pass through an emulsifier. Er. Injector. Speakin O' injectors, you could pop those bad boys out and clean them if you want. I could show you how, but the additive junk will likely do yuh.

Thumbs up to the above information too!
 
  #4  
Old 05-13-2019, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Pyts View Post
Drop that gas tank!! I'll be doing it with you. Its about time I solve my tank slosh issue, and theres a good chance it wont rain tomorrow!

If you can get the gas station folks to take accountability for this issue, outstanding! In all honesty, you could likely clear that trash out by adding a bunch of junk to your fuel like techron, lucas, seafoam, guaranteed to pass smog stuff. They all work to help algea pass through an emulsifier. Er. Injector. Speakin O' injectors, you could pop those bad boys out and clean them if you want. I could show you how, but the additive junk will likely do yuh.

Thumbs up to the above information too!

So you think a fuel Injector cleaner will work?
What type ?
 
  #5  
Old 05-13-2019, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Jakob Mend View Post
So you think a fuel Injector cleaner will work?
What type ?
Any name brand.
Beyond that i cooouuuld show you how to pop them out n test them. Its slightly involved but handy. Youd need wire, crimpers/strippers, little ring terminals. I suppose you could test them in place if you used a decent length of wire. Its basically just jumpering the battery straight to an injector. When powered the injector clicks audibly n sprays! Id also recommend quick disconnects if you wanted to like, blow 'em out/check the spray pattern to see if theyre properly, evenly emulsifying the fuel.

Another quicker check is your fuel pump. Just put the key in the ignition and turn it to on where all the dash lights illuminate. You should hear the pump woosh for 1-2 seconds then stop. Thats the fuel pump pressurizing the system.

Anooother check is fuel pressure. I dont remember with our cars where its at, but its gonna be where all the injectors connect to rails or whatever. Youll find a little cap like one for the valve stem on your wheels to air up your tires, complete with shrader valve. Some folk hook a gauge up to it to check, i just push it down with a finger nail and if it sprays fuel everywhere its got plenty of pressure. Youd ofcourse want to pressurize the system first as per above instructions

You dont smell fuel or anything when the cars running, do you? Thats evap system business. Not sure what water could do to it.

Youve got me wondering what stations do with old gasoline.
 
  #6  
Old 05-13-2019, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Pyts View Post
Any name brand.
Beyond that i cooouuuld show you how to pop them out n test them. Its slightly involved but handy. Youd need wire, crimpers/strippers, little ring terminals. I suppose you could test them in place if you used a decent length of wire. Its basically just jumpering the battery straight to an injector. When powered the injector clicks audibly n sprays! Id also recommend quick disconnects if you wanted to like, blow 'em out/check the spray pattern to see if theyre properly, evenly emulsifying the fuel.

Another quicker check is your fuel pump. Just put the key in the ignition and turn it to on where all the dash lights illuminate. You should hear the pump woosh for 1-2 seconds then stop. Thats the fuel pump pressurizing the system.

Anooother check is fuel pressure. I dont remember with our cars where its at, but its gonna be where all the injectors connect to rails or whatever. Youll find a little cap like one for the valve stem on your wheels to air up your tires, complete with shrader valve. Some folk hook a gauge up to it to check, i just push it down with a finger nail and if it sprays fuel everywhere its got plenty of pressure. Youd ofcourse want to pressurize the system first as per above instructions

You dont smell fuel or anything when the cars running, do you? Thats evap system business. Not sure what water could do to it.

Youve got me wondering what stations do with old gasoline.

Itís a Rosenberg Tx Sunoco station I end up going to the gas station this morning and it was true about the bad gas

I put in a report and should hear back from Sunoco Corp soon...
 
  #7  
Old 05-14-2019, 07:44 AM
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Back in the 1980's, EPA mandated that all underground storage tanks (fuels) be exposed, clean up any contaminated soils, and install state of the art double wall tanks. This also meant the the fill area had to be sealed up so overflows didn't go into the soil, and piping to the pumps had to be upgraded. From that point on there had to be ongoing leak testing of the whole system. Prior to that, it was common for the simple / cheap single-wall steel tanks and their simple fill / dispensing piping to allow fuel to escape into the surrounding soils and water to get in. In colder climates, like Pennsylvania, the first day of winter when we first had sub-30 deg F temps, you would see 5-10 cars stopped along the edge of the roads with frozen water in their gas lines. I don't see that happen anymore since the underground tanks were upgraded in Pennsylvania.

During those 'bad old years, you would add Methanol / Gas Line Anti-Freeze to the your tank starting a month or so before cold weather to strip out any water that was in your tank. They still sell the stuff at any car parts store / Walmart / etc. Fuel injector cleaner is designed to do other jobs but 'may' have some ability to combine with the water and burn it (alcohol is a neat molecule with one end of the chain the 'likes' petroleum and the other end that 'likes' water). That's one of the big complaints about today's gasoline blends with Ethanol - absorbs too much atmospheric water but don't worry you can 'buy' a treatment for that too.

Due to the heavy rains / flooding Texas, etc I can believe that flood waters may be getting into the underground storage tanks at local gas stations. The Gas Line Anti-Freeze stuff at Walmart is about $1.00 / bottle and one bottle does your car's tank full of gas. Cheap stuff really. I still use at least one bottle of the Gas Line Anti-Freeze per year on all of my vehicles since the heat / cool cycles in the weather can produce water condensation in the gas tank (my outdoor fuel oil tank too).

Best of luck.
 
  #8  
Old 05-14-2019, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by spike55_bmw View Post
I still use at least one bottle of the Gas Line Anti-Freeze per year on all of my vehicles since the heat / cool cycles in the weather can produce water condensation in the gas tank (my outdoor fuel oil tank too).
spike55_bmw Good tip!
 
  #9  
Old 05-14-2019, 10:10 PM
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That is a good tip indeed... Thank you
 
  #10  
Old 05-15-2019, 12:36 AM
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welll it was bad gas... Sunoco corp is paying for all the repairs once i get the shop to let me know the total amount for the fuel system, tomorrow ?

anything more i should know or do ?
 
  #11  
Old 05-15-2019, 01:14 AM
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Jakob Mend Glad to see Sunoco is covering this.

If possible, I would take it to the Honda dealer as you don't pay dealer rates. I wonder what parts they will replace.

Good luck and keep us posted.
 
  #12  
Old 05-15-2019, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Jakob Mend View Post
Well it was bad gas... Sunoco corp is paying for all the repairs once i get the shop to let me know the total amount for the fuel system, tomorrow? Anything more i should know or do ?
1.) Bad gas - Does that mean water was in what otherwise would be considered 'in spec' gas or doesn't mean that the gas was 'out of spec' and they are just using a 'catch-all' phrase?
2.) Fix the fuel system - I could see that the system needs drained, any filters should be changed is the contaminate can't easily be flushed out through normal use. What else are they talking about doing? I don't think that water will damage anything in the system if not in there for months / years.
3.) Previous work - I believe you said that the spark plugs and coil packs were changed. Will the dealer reverse that work or leave it alone and seek compensation from Sunoco for the work / parts that were technically functioning correctly but the dealer misdiagnosed the real problem?
 

Last edited by spike55_bmw; 05-15-2019 at 08:07 AM.
  #13  
Old 05-15-2019, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by spike55_bmw View Post
1.) Bad gas - Does that mean water was in what otherwise would be considered 'in spec' gas or doesn't mean that the gas was 'out of spec' and they are just using a 'catch-all' phrase?
2.) Fix the fuel system - I could see that the system needs drained, any filters should be changed is the contaminate can't easily be flushed out through normal use. What else are they talking about doing? I don't think that water will damage anything in the system if not in there for months / years.
3.) Previous work - I believe you said that the spark plugs and coil packs were changed. Will the dealer reverse that work or leave it alone and seek compensation from Sunoco for the work / parts that were technically functioning correctly but the dealer misdiagnosed the real problem?

everything will be covered =)
 
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