2015 Honda Fit KA - K.I.S.S and Lazy Reference Guide - Unofficial Honda FIT Forums


3rd Generation (2015+) Say hello to the newest member of the Fit family. 3rd Generation specific talk and questions here.

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Old 06-04-2018, 02:57 PM
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Post 2015+ Honda Fit KA - K.I.S.S and Lazy Reference Guide

3rd Gen 2015+ Honda Fit KA – USA

K.I.S.S and Lazy Reference Guide

Keeping it Stock? (Alts. Available) and Maintained












Hey, I'm a new 2015 Honda Fit EX owner. Found out about this forum last week when I bought my fit and loved it....though it's a bit disorganized. So here are my two cents and mainly a quick on the go internet available guide for myself to look back on. I'll add more info as I can or is recommended to me. Please feel free to correct me on anything and I'll try to keep this as updated with OEM and Forum recommendations as possible. For recommendations I'll either link to other forum topics or give credit in the guide. That being said....

Disclaimer: Myself or FitFreak.net are not liable for any damage or injury that may result from use of this guide.
Vehicles should be diagnosed, maintained, and repaired by qualified technicians. Use this reference guide at your own risk.











Owner's Manual and Warranty Booklet:
  • PDF Download: LINK
  • Order Physical Replacements: LINK
  • The Honda Fit has a Maintenance (Re-) Minder System info on page 357-360
Ordering OEM/Alt. Parts and Accessories:
  • Go to your dealership if you don't want to order or do things yourself.
  • HondaPartsNow : LINK
  • Honda eStore: LINK
  • RockAuto: LINK
  • HondaPartsGuy: LINK (thanks evilchargerfan)
Factory Specs:
  • Owner’s Manual Pages 432-433
  • Understanding your VIN # by TCroly: FFPermaLink
Jack Points:Tires:
  • LX: 185/60R15 84T
  • EX and EX-L: 185/55R16 83H
  • Spare: T135/80D15 99M
  • Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) Calibration: Owner’s Manual Pages 336-339
  • Diagrams & Instructions: LINK
  • OEM Alignment Specs by evilchargerfan: FFPermaLink
  • TPMS Calibration How-To: (Thanks to knope) YouTube
Engine:
  • L15B1 (Wikipedia - pulled 6/13/18)
    • Found in 2015-2019 3rd generation Honda Fit in North American Market GDI DOHC 16 valve i-VTEC
      • Displacement: 1,498 cc
      • Bore x Stroke: 73.0 mm (2.9 in) 89.4 mm
      • Power: 97 kW (132 PS; 130 hp) / 6,600 rpm
      • Torque: 155 N⋅m (114 lb⋅ft) / 4,600 rpm
      • Note: Use CRC Intake Valve Cleaner with each oil change to promote deposit free valves.
Oil:
  • Viscosity grade: 0W-20
    • Owner’s Manual Page 363.
    • Alternative Premium-grade 0W-20 detergent oil with an API Certification Seal on the container can also be used.
    • Engine oil change capacity (including filter): 3.5 US qt (3.3 L)
  • Genuine Honda: 08798-9036
Oil Filters:
  • General detailed Info about filters for Hondas' : LINK
    • Yes, not our car, but still a good breakdown.
  • Thanks to woof: Honda OEM 15400-PLM-A01 (made by Filtech)
    • Recommended in reviews over the A02 Filter
  • OEM Honeywell: 15400-PLM-A02
  • K&N HP-1010 Performance Wrench-Off Oil Filter
    • Easy to remove, comes recommended by the community.
  • PurolatorONE PL14610
    • I personally have always used only these in my cars.
Oil Change Procedures:
  • Owner’s Manual Pages 363-367
  • Drain Bolt torque 29 lbf∙ft (39 N∙m, 4.0 kgf∙m)
  • Oil Drain Plug Gasket 94109-14000
Engine Air Filter:
  • OEM Genuine Honda 17220-5R0-008
  • Alt. ECOGARD XA10424
Cabin Air Filter:
  • OEM Genuine Honda 80291-T5R-A01
  • Alt. ECOGARD XC36080
    • Quick Tip: Air flow indicator (usually an arrow) points downward.
    • Recommended replacement every 20k miles or sooner.
    • Text instructions by FITEsq: FFPermaLink
    • How To:
Engine Coolant:
  • Honda Long Life Antifreeze/Coolant Type 2
    • Owner’s Manual Pages 368-369
    • 0.999 US gal (3.78 L) *1 (change including the remaining 0.111 US gal (0.42 L) in the reserve tank)
    • Same Specs for CVT and Manual
Window Washer Fluid:
  • Use your favorite brand
  • U.S.: 2.6 US qt (2.5 L)
Transmission Fluid:
  • Owner’s Manual Page 370
  • CVT: Honda HCF-2 Transmission Fluid
  • CVT Change 3.6 US qt (3.4 L)
  • Manual: Honda Manual Transmission Fluid (MTF)
  • MTF Change 1.5 US qt (1.4 L)
    • If Honda MTF is not available, you may use the API certificated SAE 0 W-20 or 5 W-20 viscosity motor oil as a temporary measure.
    • CVT Text How To by SilverEX15: FFPermaLink
    • CVT How To:
Brake Fluid:
  • Honda Heavy Duty Brake Fluid DOT 3
    • Fill to Between the MIN and MAX marks.
    • Owner’s manual Page 371
Spark Plugs:
  • Owner’s Manual Page 432
    • NGK DILZKAR7C11S
    • Or
    • DENSO DXE22HCR11S
Serpentine Belt:Brake Pads (Front):
  • OEM 45022-T5R-A01
Brake Disc (Front):
  • OEM 45251-T5R-A02
Brake Shoes (Rear):
  • OEM 43153-SNA-A02
Brake Drum (Rear):
  • OEM 42610-T5R-A01
Windshield Wipers:
  • How-To: Owner's Manual Pages 380-383
  • Driver 28”, Passenger 14”, Rear 14”
  • Rear Rubber Blade: 76622-T5A-003
  • Rear Wiper Blade Assembly: 76730-T5A-003
  • Driver Side: 76622-T6A-J02
  • Driver Side Assembly: 76620-T5R-A02
  • Passenger Side Rubber Blade: 76632-T5A-J01
  • Passenger Side Blade Assembly: 76630-T5R-A02
Bulb Replacements:
  • How-To: Owner's Manual Pages 373-379
  • Headlight: HB2 OEM 33111-SR3-A01
    • Alt. H4,9003
  • Taillight: 12V 21W Wedge OEM 33303-SL4-003
    • Alt. 7440
  • Front Turn Signal: 12V 28W/8W Amber OEM 34911-TR0-A51
    • Alt. 7443A
  • Parking Light:
    • Alt. 7443A
  • Rear Turn Signal:
    • Alt. 7440
  • Backup/Reverse Light:
    • Alt. 7440
  • Fog Lights: 35W (H8 LL) OEM 33165-TL0-003
    • Alt. H8
  • Front Side Marker, License Plate Light, and Trunk/Cargo: 12V/5W OEM 34351-657-921
    • Alt. Sylvania 168 LED
  • Dome Light and Map Lights: 12V 8W Wedge OEM 34253-T2A-A01
    • Alt. 194/T10
Cameras:
  • Rear-view Camera replacement by SilverEX15: FFPermaLink
    • OEM 39530-T5R-A01
  • Lanewatch OEM 36580-T5R-003
HondaLink Stuff:Magic Seats Guide:
Not So Stock Stuff
Windows:
Dash Cam:
  • Easy Install by simonx314: FFPermaLink
  • Followed his steps and i couldn't be happier.
Exterior General Cleaning and Maintenance
Exterior Detailing:
  • Guide by AMMO: LINK
  • I've never used their products, but, they provide great in-depth detailing video and download PDF.
  • For best paint protection on the cheap (no bra), be sure to use a sealant then a wax on top.
  • Buy yourself some Touch-Up paint from the Honda dealer (I paid $10.95 for a touch up pen)
  • Official info?: LINK

Last edited by SilentStray; 06-15-2018 at 03:53 PM. Reason: Updated 6/15/2018
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  #2  
Old 06-04-2018, 05:46 PM
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Thank you for posting this and taking the time to do it.


In my own years of experience on many car forums, even with a stickied post, there will ALWAYS be someone asking the same questions again and again without taking the time to do a simple search.
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Old 06-04-2018, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Action Jackson View Post
Thank you for posting this and taking the time to do it.


In my own years of experience on many car forums, even with a stickied post, there will ALWAYS be someone asking the same questions again and again without taking the time to do a simple search.
Hey, no problem and your welcome. And yea, I was getting tired searching of reading through endless posts on a thread to see solutions or answers so I figured I could takes some time and consolidate. I'm a new owner though, so I dont know the ins and outs. But I'll do my best!
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Old 06-04-2018, 06:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Action Jackson View Post
Thank you for posting this and taking the time to do it.
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Old 06-04-2018, 08:18 PM
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3.5 US quarts for an oil change including the filter
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Old 06-04-2018, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Rismo2 View Post
3.5 US quarts for an oil change including the filter
Updated, thanks!
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  #7  
Old 06-04-2018, 11:56 PM
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There are actually two official Honda oil filters for the Fit. You have listed the Fram version but there is an earlier version:

Honda OEM 15400-PLM-A01 (made by Filtech)

The Filtech was the first filter and Honda later introduced the Fram manufactured version. Both are still apparently officially sold and you get one or the other depending on what happens to be in stock. The Fram is to be avoided as it is cheaply made and there are numerous very negative reviews of it on YouTube. I bought a case of 6 Filtechs on eBay recently since I do my own oil changes.
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Old 06-05-2018, 12:06 AM
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Very nice! Thank you!
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Old 06-05-2018, 12:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woof View Post
There are actually two official Honda oil filters for the Fit. You have listed the Fram version but there is an earlier version:

Honda OEM 15400-PLM-A01 (made by Filtech)

The Filtech was the first filter and Honda later introduced the Fram manufactured version. Both are still apparently officially sold and you get one or the other depending on what happens to be in stock. The Fram is to be avoided as it is cheaply made and there are numerous very negative reviews of it on YouTube. I bought a case of 6 Filtechs on eBay recently since I do my own oil changes.
Thanks, updated. Looked at reviews between the A01 and the A02. A02 is basically Fram quality so I will be sticking to the A01 if I go with a Honda OEM.
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  #10  
Old 06-05-2018, 02:32 AM
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the ultimate thread ... . we've been needing this. Im willing to help, lmk if any diagrams are needed, repair guides, etc
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  #11  
Old 06-05-2018, 10:27 AM
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by evilchargerfan View Post
the ultimate thread ... . we've been needing this. Im willing to help, lmk if any diagrams are needed, repair guides, etc
I just took a look at your threads, you've got a lot of stuff going on! I'm going to add some not so stock stuff, general things, that dont require modifications such as drilling/breaking/ or other permanent alterations. Judging from your posts you do a lot of stuff to Fits' if you have any suggestions, I'm all ears!
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Old 06-06-2018, 02:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilentStray View Post
NOTE: Do NOT buy FRAM filters.
Why the hate with fram? The DIYers who always use the OE filter for the GK will end up using a filter no different than fram's cheaper offerings in terms of build design and quality.... unless u get that japanese designed A01 variant, which is harder to come by.

I am a die hard fan of Fram's XG series (for the GK: XG7317). I took one apart and posted pics a couple of years back. They are as tough as a tank and have phenomenal build quality and are cheaper than Mobil1 EP filters in my area. Fram has always been quite underrated actually. Yes, their entry level filters are the cheapest you can find, but they get the job done for their lifespan rating. I dare say the XG series is one of the best in the industry. My dad always used Fram's cheapest stuff and had no issues. I also used other brands as well with no issues. I always came back to fram's higher end offerings. Best bang for your buck IMHO.

For tires, you might want to include the pressures listed on the driver's door sticker. For the spare I think it's 60psi, and for the 15in steelies, I think they are 33psi front and 32psi rear.

Last edited by CommanderSlug; 06-06-2018 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 06-13-2018, 04:19 PM
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this thread is too good/useful to have a battle over filters. perhaps we can create a separate oil filters faq thread, specifically so we can battle it out =)

I will suggest, perhaps remove the "avoid fram" comment, as fram buyers may be offended. I'll also agree that PL14610 is an awesome filter, I have a good 8+ yrs/100k worth of uoa's to show how awesome they are at doing their job.


BACK ON TOPIC:

Ordering OEM/Alt. Parts and Accessories:
https://www.hondapartsguys.com/ <--- suggested add, I know a few other stores are mentioned, but from what I can tell these guys have a great competitive edge for pricing and shipping fees
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  #14  
Old 06-13-2018, 05:09 PM
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I would say avoid Fram "Extra Guard" bottom of the line oil filter in the orange box typically sold at places like WalMart. Fram states it's not intended for use with synthetic oil which is the only oil specified for the Fit. It's only a 5,000 mile filter - synthetic oil is typically used for 10 to 20,000 miles. The filter efficiency of the Extra Guard is only 95% whereas it's typically 97 to 99% for better filters. etc. I'm not even getting in to the poor construction of the Extra Guard.

I do agree that Fram's higher end filters are apparently fairly good but I am offended that Fram is so happy to wrap their high reputation around something like the Extra Guard.
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Old 06-13-2018, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilchargerfan View Post
this thread is too good/useful to have a battle over filters. perhaps we can create a separate oil filters faq thread, specifically so we can battle it out =)

I will suggest, perhaps remove the "avoid fram" comment, as fram buyers may be offended. I'll also agree that PL14610 is an awesome filter, I have a good 8+ yrs/100k worth of uoa's to show how awesome they are at doing their job.


BACK ON TOPIC:

Ordering OEM/Alt. Parts and Accessories:
https://www.hondapartsguys.com/ <--- suggested add, I know a few other stores are mentioned, but from what I can tell these guys have a great competitive edge for pricing and shipping fees
Good suggestions, I'll add that site and remove oil filter comments lol, some prices are lower for certain parts and accessories. Always good to have places to shop around at.
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  #16  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:37 PM
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Great collection, here's the TPMS recalibrate procedure: https://youtu.be/64URhqvWs8s
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  #17  
Old 06-16-2018, 01:49 AM
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Originally Posted by knope View Post
Great collection, here's the TPMS recalibrate procedure: https://youtu.be/64URhqvWs8s
Thanks, added.
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  #18  
Old 06-19-2018, 05:38 PM
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how about a how to, for ball joints, and/or lower control arm? I'll provide pics from the repair manual, but someone may need to actually type words ... lol












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Old 06-21-2018, 03:36 PM
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Headlight Adjustment

Adjustment
  1. Headlight - Adjust



Before adjusting the headlights:
-Park the vehicle on a level surface.
-Make sure the tire pressures are correct.
-The driver or someone who weighs the same
should sit in the driver's seat (or use an
equivalent weight).
-Unload the vehicle.


1. Clean the outer lens so that you can see the
center (A) of the headlights.

2. Park the vehicle so that the center mark of
the headlight (A) is 7.5 m (24.6 ft) away from
a wall or screen (B).


3. Measure the height of the headlight's center
mark (A), then on the wall or screen (B),
mark the same height of the headlights with
masking tape in a straight horizontal line (C).

4. Turn on the low beam headlights.

5. To see if the headlights are adjusted
properly, observe the beams of light
projected on the wall or screen. The highest
edge or ''cut line'' (A) of the headlights
should be equal with the masking tape (B).
NOTE: To help determine if a headlight is
out of adjustment, block one of the beams
with a large piece of cardboard or equivalent,
and observe the other beam on the wall or
screen. Repeat this for the other headlight.




6. If adjustment is necessary, open the hood
and adjust the headlights to local
requirements by turning the adjuster (A).

NOTE: The R and L adjusters are not
applicable. The headlights can only be
adjusted up and down.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Headlight_Adj.pdf (186.5 KB, 3 views)
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  #20  
Old 06-23-2018, 12:37 AM
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a guide to removing the steering wheel:
https://www.fitfreak.net/forums/3rd-...ml#post1330251


Quote:
Originally Posted by stembridge View Post
DISCLAIMER - Do this at your own risk. These are not official instructions or procedures, and if you choose to attempt this mod, your experience may vary. SEVERE INJURY or DEATH can occur if the airbag goes off while you are working near it.

The parts have been sitting in my shop since July (2015), and I finally got the nerve up to do this somewhat ticklish swap. I got the leather steering wheel and CVT shift knob from one of the many OEM Honda parts houses online:

Leather Steering Wheel

Leather CVT Shift Selector Knob

The shift knob was a simple, one-minute swap (no pics) - just carefully pry the front cover under the "trigger" button forward and off (use a plastic putty knife or similar so you don't mar it), then lift the old knob off. Reverse disassembly instructions for your new leather knob. Done!

The steering wheel, on the other hand, was much more complicated, with a hint of danger since you'll be handling the airbag module.

First step is to disconnect the battery - I pulled the ground side and made sure it was tied back so it couldn't accidentally flop back over and make contact with the post while I was working in the cabin. Be sure to wait 15-30 minutes to let any residual electrons settle down (saw this on another mod post, so I presume there are capacitors or backup batteries somewhere in the system that need to bleed off).



Not having any instructions, I took the top and lower cover off behind the steering wheel itself, but it turns out there's really nothing there you need to disconnect, so you can dispense with that step. I'll include a couple photos just for reference, though. There's one screw underneath near the tilt lock lever, and the top cover just pops off, revealing two more screws that become accessible by rotating the wheel about 15 each side of "straight." Remove those, and the lower cover comes off.







Here's where things get fun. There are two torx screws accessible from either side of the back of the wheel – those hold the airbag module in place. It would not be unreasonable to wear safety glasses while handling the module, and think about where your hands and head are in relation to where the bag might go were it to go off. USE YOUR HEAD - YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY HERE!



With those two screws out, you can easily life the airbag module out, but note that there are several connections that will prevent you removing it right off.



First up is the horn connector:



It was actually a bit of a bear to remove. It's wrapped in foam, and was hard to tell if there's a spring clip on there or not. I kept worrying it with a small flat-blade screwdriver and finally got it to pop off.

Next up is to disconnect the airbag module. There are two connectors, and each have two white spring-loaded catches that have to be pried up at the same time. I used a pair of small flat-blade screwdrivers and once you get both tabs up, the whole connecter pops right off. The airbag module can be carefully set aside at this point.



Next up is to remove the steering wheel bolt. It's essentially a big cap screw, with an inset hex hole. I happened to have the right socket end to fit it, but it's not a common tool, so you may have to pick one up at an auto parts store (shouldn't cost more than a few bucks). I quickly realized that substantial leverage was going to be required - that bolt is *in there*. I finally ended up getting out my pneumatic lug wrench, and even it didn't break the bolt loose! It did, however, break the bond enough that I was able to use the long extension to get the bolt moving. I switched over to a long ratchet wrench to finish the extraction - the bolt has something like Loctite on the threads that required effort all the way out.



Once the bolt is out, make sure the airbag and horn wiring is pushed back out of the wheel, and then it would be a Really Good Idea to make a mark on both your old wheel and the steering shaft so you know the proper alignment of the two when you go to put it back together. After that, a good tug should have the wheel in your lap. Note that the floating ring (plastic) you're now looking at will indeed rotate easily. Try to avoid disturbing its location, as it also needs to be properly aligned to the steering wheel when you reinstall.



I tool the wheel into my heated shop for the next steps. First, remove the ground wire:



Note that the next steps require removal of various wiring and connectors, etc. Always look for the spring clip that holds each connector in place - some are kind of hard to get to, and you may need to partially or completely remove other components before you can get at them. Study it out and it should become obvious to you.

The rear cover is held in place by a number of clips. Take time to carefully study it before you start yanking on things, lest you break something. Each side uses two clips at the top that must be pressed at the same time (in directions 90 opposite from each other). Go ahead and do both sides, but don't try yanking the cover off just yet, because...



...you also need to unclip these at the bottom of the cover. They are quite firm, so be careful to not overstress them!



Next up is to remove the hands-free button cluster. The cover on the back side of the wheel just pops off, and you'll see two screws that hold it in place. I only removed the one screw (not seen) from the wheel itself.



You can now remove the paddle shifter modules - one screw for each:



I went ahead and transferred the paddles to my new wheel at this point. Note the pin and hole it goes into before you run your screw back in. The hole is rubber and is a "press fit."



The final piece to transfer is the front garnish. This was the diciest, as it is held in with numerous flared pins that fit into rubberized holes on the steering wheel itself. Go *very* slow and don't force anything here! I just kept carefully prying with a tape-wrapped flat screwdriver, moving things a mm at a time until I could see what was going on.







At this point, you should have everything removed from the old wheel. Installing the front garnish on the new wheel was ticklish. I had to trim a little off the leather wrap where it was slightly interfering with one of the front garnish pins, and otherwise, went slowly, not forcing anything.

Make sure you reconnect all the wiring as you go (now *that* would be a disappointment!), and once you have the wheel back together, reinstall it on the car (I do not have a torque value for the steering wheel bolt - I went as tight as I could with my long bar). Make sure you align the wheel and floating ring behind the wheel correctly as noted earlier! Thread your horn and airbag wiring back in place and reinstall the airbag module.

If you did happen to remove the covers, put those back now.

Reconnect the battery and start 'er up! I had to reset my radio, but other than than, had no error codes or anything.



es

DISCLAIMER (AGAIN!) - Do this at your own risk. These are not official instructions or procedures, and if you choose to attempt this mod, your experience may vary. SEVERE INJURY or DEATH can occur if the airbag goes off while you are working near it.
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